Essential Gus Van Sant: DRUGSTORE COWBOY on 35mm

Drugstore Cowboy 1

Van Sant’s acclaimed second feature is a daring and uncompromising look at outlaw junkie life based on the novel by James Fogle. Set in Portland in the early ‘70s, Matt Dillon gives the performance of his career as Bob Hughes, the superstitious leader of an awkward band of addicts who go directly to the source for drugs by robbing drugstores. Bob’s extended family includes his wife, Dianne (Kelly Lynch), the dim Rich (James LeGros) and his teenage girlfriend Nadine (Heather Graham). With a good dose of black humor, Van Sant follows the group’s escapades, which finally come undone when Nadine overdoses. Understanding that “Just Say No” doesn’t say anything to the drugged out, Van Sant neither romanticizes nor condemns drug use, but probes the addict’s psyche without giving way to moralistic overtures. “Compelling, unnerving and often darkly funny . . . Every minute is vital and alive.”—David Ansen, Newsweek. (100 mins.)

DRUGSTORE COWBOY screens Thursday, April 30 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).  The film is being presented as part of our Essential Gus Van Sant (& His Influences) series.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Essential Gus Van Sant (& His Influences) film series & class

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Over the last three decades, Gus Van Sant has created an extraordinary body of film work. His first long-form films of the late 1980s and early 1990s, known as the “Portland Trilogy”, feature rebellious characters on the fringes of mainstream society who yearned to form new communities. The films became instant cult classics, earning Van Sant acknowledgment as one of the most talented and imaginative filmmakers of the indie film renaissance. Over the next decade, he directed a number of films that brought him critical and commercial success (the hugely popular GOOD WILL HUNTING and his bold remake of Hitchcock’s PSYCHO), before embarking on a re-evaluation of his artistic process and a return to his early indie roots. This later remarkable group of films features innovative visual style and groundbreaking sound explorations. Along with this survey of his films, we offer an exciting selection of works by filmmakers that have influenced the Van Sant’s film practice, including works by Stanley Kubrick, Werner Herzog, and Béla Tarr.—Mario Falsetto.

Mario Falsetto, Professor Emeritus in Film Studies at Concordia University, Montreal, and author of the just published “Conversations with Gus Van Sant,” is teaching “Essential Gus Van Sant,” an eight-session non-credit course April 25—June 20. See School of Film for registration information.

Essential Gus Van Sant (& His Influences) runs Thursday, April 23 through Friday, June 5 in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).

Tickets are available online or at the door. Enrollment in the Essential Gus Van Sant class grants FREE admission to the film series.

OUT OF THE ARCHIVES: YOUTH-MADE FILMS FROM ACROSS OREGON

Out of the Archives 2

Since 1977, the Film Center’s statewide Filmmakers-in-the-Schools Program has partnered with K-12 schools and community organizations around Oregon to bring the power of filmmaking to young people through artist residencies with Film Center faculty. Hundreds of youth-authored films have been made, many of them now a capsule in time. With support from a grant from the Oregon Heritage Commission and Oregon Parks & Recreation Department, 84 of these films have recently been rescued from the clutches of aging videotape stock by being digitized onto archival media. Drawing from those archives, this screening presents a vintage youth-eye view of how family and community define and reflect us and includes: KEEP OUR LAND FOR THE FUTURE (1991), about how young people are helping to shape the future of the rural community of Pine Creek, Oregon, created through an artist residency with Kristy Edmunds; THOUGHT I KNEW: FACING REALITY FROM THE INSIDE (1993), a call out from incarcerated teens in the MacLaren Correctional Facility in Salem, Oregon, about living a life of honesty, sobriety and personal responsibility, created with artist-in-residence Christopher Ley; and FRIENDS FIRST (1992), a Romeo and Juliet-inspired story of escape and recovery, created with Taft High School in Newport, Oregon, and artist-in-residence Sharon Genasci.

 

OUT OF THE ARCHIVES: YOUTH-MADE FILMS FROM ACROSS OREGON screens Friday, April 10 at 5:30pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).

Free with admission to the Portland Art Museum, which is $5 after 5 PM on Fridays.

AN EVENING WITH COMMUNITY-BASED STORYTELLERS

An Evening wiht Community-Based Storytellers

Journalism and media work are no longer performed by journalists and media professionals alone. The public wants to create, contribute, and share news and information. Tonight, filmmakers Elaine McMillion (HOLLOW, an interactive documentary and community participatory project that examines the future of rural America through the eyes and voices of those living in McDowell County, West Va), Michael Premo (SANDY STORYLINES, stories of the ongoing recovery from Hurricane Sandy), Laura Lo Forti (NPMTC VANPORT MULTIMEDIA PROJECT, a participatory oral history initiative that captures and honors the stories of Vanport Flood survivors), and panel moderator Jigar Mehta (18 DAYS IN EGYPT, an interactive storytelling website documenting a year of revolution in Egypt) will describe their interactive projects and documentaries, which are indicative of how journalists and media makers are redefining storytelling to engage with communities. This screening and panel discussion is part of the University of Oregon School of Journalism and Communication’s “What is Journalism? Conference,” April 9-11. The public conference explores the past, present, and future of journalism as we move into the digital age.

Learn more about the “What is Journalism?” conference.

 

AN EVENING WITH COMMUNITY-BASED STORYTELLERS screens Friday, April 10 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Northwest Tracking: FOR THE RECORD

For the Record

If a court reporter is doing their job well, they go virtually unnoticed. The goal is to capture the record without becoming a part of it. Ironically, that very ability means that court reporting flies under the radar. FOR THE RECORD tracks several stenographers as they strive to break the Guinness World Record and seize the title of World’s Fastest Court Reporter. It also explores the steno culture, the connections people make as interpreters for the hard of hearing, and charts the history of these keepers of the record. Marc Greenberg has spent 20 years working within the court reporting industry, returning to his earlier passion of filmmaking to tell the story of a little-known world. (68 mins.)

Director Marc Greenberg will be in attendance.

 

FOR THE RECORD screens Thursday, April 9 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).  The film is being presented as part of our ongoing Northwest Tracking series.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

See How the Bubbly Gets Made in A YEAR IN CHAMPAGNE

A Year in Champagne

Only sparkling wine produced within the boundaries of the Champagne region is truly “Champagne.” Wine importer Martine Saunier leads us on a tours of six Champagne makers to see how they make their product, from small independent producer Saint-Chamant to the illustrious houses of Gosset and Bollinger. Most Champagne is not just the product of a specific year. Signature house styles are creations that happen behind closed doors and in the miles of cellars beneath the countryside. Pull back the curtain and see how the people of a cold, tough land with a grim history of wars and conflict triumph in producing the drink of joy, seduction, and celebration. In Champagne, they don’t sell Appellations, they sell Brands, many of which have been famous for 200 years. (82 mins.)

A YEAR IN CHAMPAGNE screens Friday, April 3 at 7pm, Saturday, April 4 at 5pm, Sunday, April 5 at 3pm, and Sunday, April 5 at 5pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Northwest Tracking: KOINONIA

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In a post-American, post-civilization era, billions of people have mysteriously vanished. The cities, left in shambles, are now hubs for the ugliest crimes imaginable. Having lost his family, John heads into the woods to find a mythical town called Faraday. Rumors have spread that its residents have technologically adapted themselves beyond normal human capabilities, and he believes they might be able to save him or help him discover where his family has gone. Tortured physically, mentally, and spiritually, and fighting to survive, John discovers the nearly dead Gaby, whom he nurses back to health. As they share stories about how their lives used to be, what they believe happened, and what lies ahead for their survival, belief and memory are put to the test. (94 mins.)

KOINONIA screens Thursday, March 19 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).  The film is being presented as part of our ongoing Northwest Tracking series.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Italian Style: SUMMERTIME – 35mm print!

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Jane (Katharine Hepburn), a lonely American spinster on vacation in Venice and hoping to find romance, succumbs to a passionate, bittersweet affair with Renato (Rossano Brazzi), a married Italian antique dealer. A visually enchanting valentine to the glories of the city as well as an endearing love story, Jane’s transformation from gloom to joy is echoed in an evolving wardrobe designed by Rosi Gori. A key item is a certain pair of red mules designed by Pompei in 1955 and reproduced in more recent years by Giuseppe Zanotti. “The film had an enormous effect on tourism. I remember the head of a hotel chain coming up to me and saying, ‘We ought to put a monument up to you.’”—David Lean. (102 mins.)

SUMMERTIME screens Sunday, March 15 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).  The film is being presented as part of our Italian Style series.

The Portland Art Museum’s exhibition, “Italian Style: Fashion Since 1945,” provides the inspiration for this survey of iconic Italian and Italian-set classics from the 1950s and 60s. During this era, Italian fashion, and everything from Italian thought, attitude, and automobiles to food, design, and Vespas, influenced audiences, filmmakers and culture worldwide—especially in the United States. A legacy of alluring films, directors, and stars timelessly endures, still providing inspiration and an unmistakably Italian vision of pop culture cool.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Italian Style: JULIET OF THE SPIRITS – 35mm print!

Juliet-of-the-Spirits

The female counterpoint to 8½, Fellini ventures deeply into the surreal as JULIET OF THE SPIRITS explores the repressed desires of a bourgeois housewife, played by Giulietta Masina who stars as a middle-aged woman haunted by hallucinations from her past and subconscious. While her husband philanders, she consults clairvoyants and mediums and escapes into a world of imagination drawn from the “spirits” of her past, present, and future. In an effort to prevent her world from crumbling, she confronts the specters and fantasies that have imprisoned her throughout her life. A lavish and baroque visual spectacle, JULIET boasts Gianni de Venanzo’s brilliant cinematography, a memorable score by Nino Rota, and the opulent fashion designs of Piero Gheradi, who won Oscars for Best Costume Design for LA DOLCE VITA and 8½. Winner of the Golden Globe Award for Best Foreign Language Picture. (148 mins.)

JULIET OF THE SPIRITS screens Saturday, March 14 at 7pm and Sunday, March 15 at 4pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).  The film is being presented as part of our Italian Style series.

The Portland Art Museum’s exhibition, “Italian Style: Fashion Since 1945,” provides the inspiration for this survey of iconic Italian and Italian-set classics from the 1950s and 60s. During this era, Italian fashion, and everything from Italian thought, attitude, and automobiles to food, design, and Vespas, influenced audiences, filmmakers and culture worldwide—especially in the United States. A legacy of alluring films, directors, and stars timelessly endures, still providing inspiration and an unmistakably Italian vision of pop culture cool.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Italian Style: L’AVVENTURA – 35mm print!

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Antonioni’s meditation on meaning in modern existence remains an obligatory experience in existential cinema-going. On a yachting trip off Sicily, a woman (Lea Massari) mysteriously disappears during an excursion on a desolate island. Her lover (Gabriele Ferzetti) and her friend (Monica Vitti) begin a search, but during the fruitless quest, each slowly becomes enamored with the other and their guilt is soon replaced by passion. L’AVVENTURA is at once a mesmerizing mystery, a thought-provoking study of human behavior—the impermanence of romance, bourgeois boredom, and the ease with which we betray one another—an experiment in the expressive use of landscape, costume, and architecture, and an allegory on the troubled state of postwar Italy. Adriana Berselli’s costumes introduced a modern, understated Italian glamour, blending with the landscape as a key element to understanding the characters and their purposeless lives. Winner of the Special Jury Prize at Cannes. (143 mins.)

L’AVVENTURA screens Friday, March 13 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).  The film is being presented as part of our Italian Style series.

The Portland Art Museum’s exhibition, “Italian Style: Fashion Since 1945,” provides the inspiration for this survey of iconic Italian and Italian-set classics from the 1950s and 60s. During this era, Italian fashion, and everything from Italian thought, attitude, and automobiles to food, design, and Vespas, influenced audiences, filmmakers and culture worldwide—especially in the United States. A legacy of alluring films, directors, and stars timelessly endures, still providing inspiration and an unmistakably Italian vision of pop culture cool.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

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