MANAKAMANA

Manakamana

“Stephanie Spray and Pacho Velez’s (literally) transporting film—shot inside a cable car that carries pilgrims and tourists to and from a mountaintop temple in Nepal—is radically simple in conception. Each of its shots lasts as long as a one-way ride, which corresponds to the duration of a roll of 16mm film. This newest work from Harvard’s Sensory Ethnography Lab—which previously produced SWEETGRASS and LEVIATHAN—is thrillingly mysterious in its effects: a staged documentary, a cross between science fiction and ethnography, an airborne version of an Andy Warhol screen test. As with the richest structural films, MANAKAMANA is a kind of head movie that viewers are invited to complete as they watch. An endlessly suggestive film that both describes and transcends the bounds of time and space.”—New York Film Festival. “The must-see cinematic experience of the year.” –Indiewire. (118 mins.)

MANAKAMANA screens Friday, October 3 at 7pm and Saturday, October 4 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).
Tickets are available online or at the door.

Northwest Film Center & Design Week Portland present: LEVITATED MASS w/ director Doug Pray in attendance at the Oct. 5th screening

LevitatedMassDougPray-600x350

LEVITATED MASS chronicles the journey of a 340-ton granite boulder that was moved from a quarry in Riverside, Calif., to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and mounted upon the walls of a 456-foot-long concrete slot. First attempted in 1968, the 2012 permanent installation Levitated Mass is the latest land sculpture by one of America’s most misunderstood and exciting artists, Michael Heizer. His rock’s 105-mile transport captured international media attention and challenged the imagination of thousands of southern Californians over 10 nights as it crawled through four counties on a football-field-long transport. As fascinating is the dramatic story of Heizer’s past and present work, the ambitions of a major metropolitan museum, and the public’s reaction to this massive display of modern (yet ancient-feeling) conceptual art. (88 mins.)

Director Doug Pray in attendance at the Sunday screening.

Presented in association with Design Week Portland, October 4-11, 2014.

 

LEVITATED MASS screens Sunday, October 5 at 2pm and Monday, October 6 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).
Tickets are available online or at the door.

Martin Scorsese Presents: Masterpieces of Polish Cinema – THE CONSTANT FACTOR

constant-factor

A naïve and sincere young man, Witold, must come to terms with the reality of the world. He dreams of climbing the Himalayas, just as his father had done before him. His skill in mathematics earns him a job in an international trade company, but he soon finds the position grating and his progress thwarted by his own candor. Frustrations mount and personal losses grow as Witold becomes disillusioned with the world’s false choices. “The chess-master precision of Zanussi’s narrative is closer, as film, to Bresson or Rohmer than it is to the passionate sprawls of Wajda or Kieślowski…every element in this spare, crystalline film is integrated into the whole.” —J. Hoberman. Jury Prize and Prize of the Ecumenical Jury, 1980 Cannes Film Festival. (98 mins.)

THE CONSTANT FACTOR screens Thursday, October 2 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).  The film is being presented as part of the Martin Scorsese Presents: Masterpieces of Polish Cinema series.
Tickets are available online or at the door.

Martin Scorsese Presents: Masterpieces of Polish Cinema – A SHORT FILM ABOUT KILLING

A Short Film About Killing

Krzysztof Kieślowski’s epic miniseries The Decalogue—contemporary stories based on the Ten Commandments played out in a Warsaw apartment block—was a landmark innovation in late 1980s European television. A SHORT FILM ABOUT KILLING (from Decalogue V) tragically mixes the destinies of two odd and unsettling characters who wander the streets of Warsaw. The grim narrative is, in the end, an intelligent meditation on both the act of murder and the ordeal of capital punishment. (84 mins.)

A SHORT FILM ABOUT KILLING screens Wednesday, October 1 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).  The film is being presented as part of the Martin Scorsese Presents: Masterpieces of Polish Cinema series.
Tickets are available online or at the door.

Martin Scorsese Presents: Masterpieces of Polish Cinema – BLIND CHANCE

Blind Chance

“A fascinating precursor to Krzysztof Kieślowski’s THREE COLORS trilogy and a biting condemnation of the complex choices (or lack thereof) of individuals in a totalitarian regime, BLIND CHANCE was made near the beginning of the Solidarity period but banned after the declaration of martial law. A trilogy of stories following three possible life paths for its main character, in the first he becomes a Party member, in the second he joins a dissident movement, and in the third he decides ‘not to be involved in either.’ Highlighting the interconnected nature of fate, secondary characters from one segment turn up in another, while the ending unites them in a final tragedy.”—Pacific Film Archive. (114 mins.)

BLIND CHANCE screens Tuesday, September 30 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).  The film is being presented as part of the Martin Scorsese Presents: Masterpieces of Polish Cinema series.
Tickets are available online or at the door.

Northwest Tracking: I LIVE FOR ART w/ special guests in attendance

I Live for Art

“I LIVE FOR ART examines creativity from both a philosophical and first-hand perspective. The creatives are composer Brian McWhorter, whose latest project involves a creativity machine borne of a bathtub; Mark Applebaum, working through all manner of different creative musical endeavors; and Mark Gould of Pink Baby Monster, who is often seen working alongside, and creatively antagonizing, McWhorter. As the three go about explaining their work, theoretical quantum physicist and philosopher Amit Goswami, storyteller Michael Meade, and event producer Elliot Rasenick offer a grander narrative of human existence and history, their insights serving to connect the individual acts of creativity to the collective whole of life.”—Film Threat. (73 mins.)

Directors Ri Stewart and Renee Slade and artists Brian McWorder and Mark Applebaum will be in attendance.

 

I LIVE FOR ART screens Thursday, September 25 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).  The film is being presented as part of our ongoing Northwest Tracking series.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Northwest Tracking: I AM NOT A ROCK STAR

I am Not a Rock Star

The sacrifice of self, the acclaim, the adoring crowds… classical pianist Marika Bournaki fits the role. But the title of Oregon-born Bobbi Jo Hart’s award-winning portrait speaks to the contradictions of Bournaki’s life. Made over a span of eight years—following the classical phenom from age 12 to 20–the experience amounts to a front-row seat in the transition from child to adult and the forming of a personality. Shot in vérité style in concert halls and on the road around the world, Bournaki’s experience and stunning performances reveal both the rewards and costs of a life dedicated to music. (85 mins.)

 

I AM NOT A ROCK STAR screens Thursday, September 18 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).  The film is being presented as part of our ongoing Northwest Tracking series.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

(Re)Discoveries: Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s ALI: FEAR EATS THE SOUL – new 35mm print!

Ali Fear Eats the Soul

Fassbinder, who in his own way was always examining social norms and systems, here takes on the twin issues of explicit racism and love across generations, with his tale of the chance relationship between Moroccan guest worker Ali (El Hedi ben Salem) and aging, German-born housekeeper Emmi (Brigitte Mira), who meet in a bar when both are feeling depressed about their station in life. When their friends and families (among them Fassbinder himself as a lecherous boy- friend to one of Emmi’s daughters) learn of the relationship, each has a negative reaction, with actions ranging from out- ward rejection to humiliation. However, rather than focusing solely on the ugliness born of prejudice, Fassbinder focuses on Emmi and Ali’s love for each other, which takes on a poetic, hopeful tone for society in general. “For all his hatred of humanity, Fassbinder really loves his unlikely couple, and I think we wind up remembering this heartbreaking pair long after we’ve forgotten the plot or the argument.”—Jonathan Rosenbaum. (94 mins.)

35mm print courtesy of Janus Films.

 

ALI: FEAR EATS THE SOUL screens Friday, September 12 at 7pm and Sunday, September 14 at 4:30pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).  The film is being presented as part of our (Re)Discoveries: New Restorations, New Prints series.
Tickets are available online or at the door.

Northwest Tracking: EVERGREEN w/ producer Nils Cowan in attendance

Evergreen still

The passage of I-502—the ballot initiative that legalized recreational marijuana usage in Washington State—attracted national attention. EVERGREEN follows the successful campaign in detail and provides an overview of the debates involved in pushing the initiative to the finish line. “Morton captures the crucial moment when plenty of people agree on the general idea of legalization, but differ wildly on its specifics. The dissenting voices come not from those opposed to the legalization, but rather the terms of regulation set fort in the initiative. Rather than viewing the cause exclusively through the stoned proclamations of the movement’s base, most of the people featured are levelheaded advocates of fair policies.”—Indiewire. (86 mins.)

Producer Nils Cowan will be in attendance.

 

EVERGREEN screens Wednesday, September 10 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).  The film is being presented as part of our ongoing Northwest Tracking series.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

(Re)Discoveries: Howard Hawks’ RIO BRAVO – new 2k restoration!

 Rio Bravo

John Wayne, Dean Martin, and Ricky Nelson team up in this idiosyncratic take on the “singing cowboy” Western from the ever-versatile Howard Hawks. When aging Sheriff John T. Chance (Wayne), who oversees a very small, unnamed Western town, arrests and jails accused murderer Joe Burdette (Claude Akins), Burdette’s brother Nathan vows revenge and hires guns with the intention of breaking Joe out. Chance, knowing he will be unable to hold off the Burdette clan, enlists Stumpy (Walter Brennan), his faithful deputy, Dude (Martin), the town drunk with demons to spare, and Colorado Ryan (Nelson), a young gunslinger with much to prove, to help him with the Burdette problem. Meanwhile, Feathers (Angie Dickinson), a beautiful local innkeeper, becomes increasingly involved in Chance’s affairs, much to his not-so-reluctant chagrin. As a showdown with the Burdettes looms, Chance is forced to evaluate his place and what kind of life he wants to live. “To watch RIO BRAVO is to see a master craftsman at work. The film is seamless. There is not a shot that is wrong. It is uncommonly absorbing.”—Roger Ebert. (141 mins.)

2k digital restoration completed by Warner Bros. from the original camera negative.

 

RIO BRAVO screens Saturday, September 6 at 4:30pm and Sunday, September 7 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).  The film is being presented as part of our (Re)Discoveries: New Restorations, New Prints series.
Tickets are available online or at the door.

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